Challenge 2020 – 10

Parthenon

This final installment of the Challenge 2020 series takes us to the Parthenon. Not the one in Athens, Greece, but the full size replicate in Nashville. Tennessee.

Parthenon – Nashville

This last photo tells you why there are no photos from the inside here. Maybe next time.

.:. © 2020 Ludwig Keck

Challenge 2020 – 9

Cumberland Pass

Challenge 9 takes us to the historic Cumberland Pass, at the place where Tennessee, Virginia, and Kentucky meet. Here in this title image we are looking down at the town of Cumberland Pass from the Pinnacle Overlook. You can see from the rocks in the foreground that this is not an aerial photo.

Look closer at the town:

The pass and the town have been reshaped by history again and again. The pioneers came on horseback and with wagons. They laboriously built a road to open the way to the west. This became the legendary gateway across the Appalachian mountains. Then came the railroad and the tunnel builders. The railroad was updated and rerouted. You can see the modern tracks on the right in the image. If you look closely you will see shadow on the main street – apparently from a box. That is a covered bridge on an earlier railway right-of-way. Let you eye follow to the right and you will see another covered bridge. Let’s visit that one.

In the distance beyond the town, in the top image, you can see the modern interstate highway. Nowadays we are oblivious of the pain and travails the folks in earlier days had to go through.

It is just a quick dash through the modern tunnel, hardly any need to slow down.

On top of the “gap”, the renowned pass, looked like this a hundred years ago. We see it on a trail-side sign.

The old road has been turned over to nature. There is just a hiking path there now, almost the way it was in the pioneer days.

.:. © 2020 Ludwig Keck

Challenge 2020 – 8

Kentucky!

This challenge takes us to the Woodford Reserve Distillery in Versailles, KY.

Rather than retell my stories I will just send you to several of my prior posts.

The full story of my visit, way back in 2015, was told in this post: Making Bourbon.

Woodford Reserve Distillery – visitor center

Then more recently, over on Monday Window – Windows at a distillery

And also right here in this blog as part of the Monday Window series back in 2016: Monday Window – 20

Guess I must have whet your appetite by now. How about a taste?

Tasting room

.:. © 2020 Ludwig Keck

Challenge 2020 – 7

Abbey Church

Monastery Church

This challenge takes us to the Abbey Church at the Monastery of the Holy Spirit near Conyers, Georgia.

This concrete church, as well as the other structures, were built by the monks in the years 1944 to 1959. They still maintain a stained glass studio and provide windows to other churches, organizations and private buyers.

The windows in this church are plain panels, predominately blue. This gives the sanctuary a calm. cool light.

.:. © 2020 Ludwig Keck

Challenge 2020 – 6

Tybee Island

The beach on Tybee Island, Georgia, is a popular, fun place. What can I say? Just take in the view. Can you hear the seagulls, the joyous crowd, smell the salt air? Well, my photos aren’t that good, but you get the message.

There is a spirited enthusiasm at this beach that is neatly expressed by the jolly roger.

There is more to Tybee, of course, than just the beach. Here a little glimpse of Battery Garland of Fort Screven to hint at the rich history of this place. Also reminders of the more dangerous side that the Atlantic can present. And the lighthouse beyond that has helped to guide seafarers on their travels.

 

.:. © 2020 Ludwig Keck

Challenge 2020 – 5

Fort Pulaski

My Challenge 4 image shows gun mounts at Fort Pulaski, That fort, from before the American Civil War, sits on Cockspur Island in the mouth of the Savannah river by Tybee Island. It was constructed beginning in 1829 as part of the coastal defenses of the then young United States.

The fort and its guns were considered an impenetrable defense for the port of Savannah. Some of the walls were as much as 11 feet thick and made of brick. It is a little amusing to see the moat, drawbridge, and gate like a medieval castle.

The Confederacy had taken over the fort and in 1862 Union forces laid siege to the fort. Using the newest war weapons, rifled guns, they reduced one corner to rumble in a 30-hour bombardment. The fort surrendered. An that represented the end of brick fortifications.

The heavily damaged corner was repaired in short order by the Union forces, but much of the damage to other parts of the wall remains to these days.

A few more views to give you an idea of the fort as it is nowadays.

.:. © 2020 Ludwig Keck

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